DA (2.1) browser does not save passwords

Hi, a problem with the DA (2.1) browser. For some sites I need to fill in passwords and username (like here in the forum) to get access.

But although Safari is able to remember passwords and usernames, the DA webbrowser isn´t, although I go to this sites through my safari bookmarks in DA.

Is there a way to make the DA webbrowser remembering passwords and usernames?

Thanks in advance.

Marcus

I have to use Firefox on a particular site and I can’t tell you how pleasant it is for my username and password to be filled in automatically each time I log in.

Since I’ve owned it, DA has never asked if I wanted to save a password to Keychain nor has it ever accessed Keychain to fill in those blanks. As far as I can recall, it’s not done this for any site I’ve ever visited in the two years I’ve used it as my main browser.
I put up with it as a minor tick in an otherwise excellent piece of work, but support for Keychain would be nice.

Mark

DA 2.1
OS X (10.3.9)

1Password (shareware) offers integration with DA that provides password integration (and a heck of a lot more) if you are interested.
Just letting you know.

Zenrain

Thanks for the tip. 1Passwd looks pretty good, although it seems a bit on the expensive side. That and the fact that you need 10.4.x will keep me from checking it out for a while.

Mark

Thanks, but does that mean, that there exists no in-house solution in the DA-webbrowser for passwords?

There’s really quite a range of ways sites use username/password registration, and DA handles many of them.

If it’s done by the Web site by using cookies, there’s no problem. For example, my DA preferences for cookies is set to accept cookies only for sites to which I navigate. I can automatically login to an online subscription journal site such as Science Magazine via a cookie that was set when I first logged in with my username and password. From then on, login is automatic. As it happens, every one of the subscription journals that I use works this way; the logon process is absolutely transparent once set up.

But there are some sites that I think should not allow fully automatic logon, including password completion.

My online banking site has a cookie set on my computer that recognizes it and displays my username when I go to their site. But the password must be entered each time – and the bank is smart enough to prohibit automatic password completion, which would reduce security. If I try that, I’m forced to request a new account registration each time I try to access the bank site (requiring knowledge of the password). I’m glad they do that, as automatic login via Keychain memory of the password would mean that anyone could sit down at my computer and access my financial accounts – not a good idea. So as a practical matter, I’m forced to remember the password, whether I use DEVONagent, Safari or Firefox, and for such sites that’s a very good thing. They also use a little trick that would frustrate someone who might have installed a spy application to track keystrokes. My other financial sites are not that smart, and I wish they were. :slight_smile:

Thanks Bill for your reply.

Okay I tested it with my Science Magazine account and it works. But it does not work with my account for the pressite of Nature, although it does work when I use my Safari browser.

Any suggestion what could be the problem? (I allow cookies just for sites I´m visiting, like you).

I would like to use the browser for my research, and for private things Safari …

Marcus

Thought I’d bump this because it’s still a problem.
DA doesn’t handle any situation involving passwords or forms for me and never has.

There has never been a dialog asking if I’d like to save a password in Keychain nor has it ever accessed Keychain to automatically fill in my username and password while accessing forums.

Any thoughts?
Thanks.
Mark

OS X (10.4.10)
DA 2.2

No, DEVONagent doesn’t handle as many password situations as does Safari.

But I routinely visit sites with login/passoword requirements that Safari can’t automatically handle. Nor can Firefox or any other browser I’ve tried. Especially for security reasons, I suspect we will see more and more of those types of sites on the Web. There’s a point to that. Security has been compromised if anyone who sits down at your computer (or can remotely login) can access all sites and data.

That’s why there’s a market for OnePassWord, which specializes in such automatic fill-ins.

Caution. OnePassWord uses an input manager plugin as a “hack” of the operating system. Earlier versions often caused DEVONagent to crash. The developer was aware of this and posted a build that should be more compatible with DEVONagent. And input manager plugins may break after an OS upgrade or update.

And I’m aware of at least one Web site that has been modified so that an automatic login routine such as OnePassWord cannot successfully login.

Thanks, Bill.

Maybe it’s time to take another look at OnePassword. The price put me off the first time.

Mark